Theatre

Sunny Afternoon – Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton 

Originally published on The Reviews Hub 

‘But will they still play it in 30 years’ time?’ asks The Kinks frontman Ray Davies of his song Sunny Afternoon. Indeed, more than 50 years later, the renowned hit is the titular track of a multi-award winning musical, telling the captivating story of the iconic British rock band in a near faultless production.

Boasting an incredible soundtrack including Lola, You Really Got Me, Dedicated Follower of Fashion and Dead End Street, the show charts the rise, fall and rise again of four working class boys from North London, who took the 1960s pop charts by storm and helped to shape the most influential era of British music.

Told through the eyes of Ray Davies, the musical vividly recreates the sounds, style and spirit of the sixties. The group’s hit records are seamlessly woven into the narrative or recreated in concert scenes, and by casting actors who are also talented musicians, director Edward Hall has created an energetic and authentic-feeling biopic.

Ryan O’Donnell is superb as Ray, showing both intensity and vulnerability in his voice and characterisation as the genius songwriter. Equally good is Mark Newnham as Ray’s younger brother, Dave ‘the Rave’. Dave enjoys all the trappings of sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll, and often clashes with his more serious brother over his lifestyle and position in the band. Although at times slightly Kevin and Perry-esque, Newnham provides a lot of the laughs as the belligerent loose cannon.

Showing himself to be a terrific drummer, Andrew Gallo is well cast as Mick Avory and Garmon Rhys gives a touching portrayal as reserved bassist Pete Quaife. Praise must also go to Lisa Wright as Ray’s spirited wife Rasa – her duets with O’Donnell and solo performance of the romantic ballad I Go To Sleep are beautiful.

There are many highlights – we see how the raucous guitar riff of You Really Got Me came to be, how the group got themselves banned from America, relive England’s 1966 World Cup victory with Sunny Afternoon, there’s a stunning a cappella rendition of Days and a rousing Lola finale which has the audience up on its feet.

A large set constructed of multiple speakers provides a suitable backdrop, multi-tasking as required to represent a bedroom, concert hall or recording studio. Talking of speakers, at times it feels there is a sound conflict between instruments and vocals, with the latter being slightly drowned out. That said, this is dark and dirty rock ‘n’ roll, and if it isn’t loud, it doesn’t count.

More than just a jolly jukebox musical, Sunny Afternoon packs an emotional punch, exploring the pitfalls of success, battles with management and tensions within the band – particularly the difficult relationship between the two Davies brothers. There is a raw, emotive quality to Ray Davies’ lyrics, reflecting not only his reality but the reality of many, which is perhaps why the music and story of The Kinks have transferred so well to theatre and continues to capture the imagination of audiences.

Vibrantly nostalgic, funny and heartfelt, the current UK tour is due to wrap up in May, be sure to catch it.

Clare

Runs until 22 April 2017 and on tour

Image: Kevin Cummins

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